Posts Tagged "Can you Pressure Wash in the Winter?"

Can you Pressure Wash in the Winter?

We often get questioned on why we close up shop during the winter months. While I do not like having water hit my face and hands in October and November, it is not the reason pressure washing companies close up shop in our area between December and February. People often say “Well you have a hot water heater to heat up the water.” While this is is in fact true water still has the potential to freeze in the lines, hoses and water pump before the water reaches the hot water heater. Sure, many pressure washing contractors like us here at J&J Power Wash have an enclosed box truck. Sure we can install electric heaters, pilot lights and heat lamps to protect water pumps. And sure, we can install recirculating water pumps in our water tanks to keep the water circulating throughout the day making it more difficult for the water to freeze. But what none of these things do is protect the homeowner or commercial property clients from several issues. Let’s say we pressure wash a vinyl siding home in mid-January with temperatures expecting to be below freezing. If we get your siding looking brand new, which is not a guarantee because the chemicals we use to clean your home often do not work below a certain temperature, the water we use still has to go somewhere. Aluminum brighteners and acid washes do not work below 60 degree temperatures. What if it freezes on your siding or roofing and creates an ice dam and damages your home? What if we pressure wash your sidewalks and the water freezes and someone comes along and slips on your property? It is almost impossible for us to guarantee that we do not spray door locks and door jams on your property or break drums on commercial vehicles. These can freeze  and cause several issues. It is for these reasons that we encourage homeowners and commercial property owners to wait until the weather breaks in late February or early March to have any pressure washing completed. While we probably would be able to make it work there is just too much risk involved to...

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